Indiana University
Education Conference

July 13th & 14th, 2022

From Surviving to Thriving

Join us online and In-person for one of the largest, most comprehensive educational summits in the country. Don't miss conference news and details Register today.

The Indiana University Education Conference provides professional development opportunities to educators and administrators in K-12 and higher education that lead to equitable educational outcomes for students of color.

Wednesday sessions are virtual and free.

Thursday Sessions are in person at the Indiana Convention Center. The cost to register for Thursday is $35 to cover lunch.

GROUP REGISTRATION INDIVIDUAL REGISTRATION

Thursday Morning Opening Keynote Speaker

Robert Jackson
Thursday July 14th Opening Keynote Speaker

Robert Jackson

For every problem, there is a solution.  This is Jackson’s motto.  Jackson began his teaching career 26 years ago in Indianapolis Public Schools with a No More Excuses teaching approach with all of his students after being cut from the NFL Minnesota Vikings in 1995. As an educator, he didn’t allow his students to feel sorry for themselves or let their circumstances define their futures. He set high expectations for his students and expected them to do well. As a Coach, the same rules applied. Those same students went from low performing to successful Pastors, Lawyers, School Administrators, Teachers, Pharmaceutical Sales Reps, Business Owners, Pro Athletes, Entertainers and more. 

 Jackson has become one of the most sought-after speakers in the country, delivering keynote addresses and workshops to educators, administrators, parents and students, corporate events and churches. He has delivered hundreds of presentations and has become an expert in teaching cultural diversity, restorative practices, socio emotional learning, trauma informed care, and the education of Black and Latino males. His goal is to teach educators and administrators how to use their power more effectively to educate, activate and motivate all students to be successes. 

 Jackson has written and published six books and has written articles for ASCD EL Leadership Magazine. His latest ASCD book, “Becoming the Educator They Need: Strategies, Mindsets, and Beliefs for Supporting Male Black and Latino Students” won the Gold Excel Award for Technical Writing in 2020. His “No More Excuses” Curriculum has been featured in publications nationally and is being utilized in K-12 Schools, Colleges and Universities in the US and Canada. His other books include, “Black Men Stand Up”, “A Boys Guide to Manhood”, “A Young Woman’s Guide to Womanhood”, “Put a Stop to Bullying” and “Solutions to Educating Black and Latino Males.” 

 Jackson attended Western Kentucky University where he received his BS Degree in Industrial Technology while lettering four years in both Football and Track. After being cut from the NFL, he was broken himself and understands the importance of educators and administrators being sensitive to students who have experienced trauma and let downs. He teaches solutions while remaining deeply rooted in his commitment to serve his community as a speaker and mentor. He has keynoted and conducted workshops at national conferences including ASCD, ESEA, CAAASA, NABSE, SREB, Innovative Schools Summit, AMLE, and AASA. 

 Jackson is a Life Member of Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity Inc. and the NFL Players Association. He has received numerous awards for his work including the NOBLE Justice by Action Youth Award, the Key to the City of Miami, Florida, and the National Motivational Educator of the Year Award by the Alpha Foundation. Thousands of youth and adults are being transformed through his speeches and presentations. 

Thursday Afternoon Closing Keynote Speaker

Dr. Adolph Brown, III is an American businessman, investor, author, urban and rural school educator, research-scientist, and keynote speaker. For over 30 years, Dr. Brown has researched, field-tested, and implemented a set of concrete strategies used to support and enhance schools and businesses around the world. Dr. Brown is best known for inspiring all who hear him to learn, laugh and lead, while as an implicit bias speaker simultaneously reducing unconscious bias at every turn. He is a credentialed Master Teacher and uses those skills to help teachers reach every student. As a much sought-after and highly effective Unconscious Bias, Equity, Diversity and Inclusion keynote speaker, Dr. Brown skillfully addresses the impact of stereotypes.

Although he does not consider himself a motivational speaker, he was selected as one of the top motivational and inspirational speakers in America as well. Dr. Adolph Brown is one of the world’s foremost attitude experts, personal development coaches and humorists. Through his engaging and exciting presentations he has earned the reputation as “The World’s Greatest Edu-tainer!™” !

Dr. Brown has earned undergraduate degrees in anthropology and psychology with a minor in education, master’s degree work in special education and experimental psychology, and a doctorate degree in clinical psychology from the Virginia Consortium for Professional Psychology hosted by Eastern Virginia Medical School, the College of William and Mary, Norfolk State University, and Old Dominion University. Before joining the psychology/education faculty at Hampton University, Dr. Brown became one of the initial major investigators of “The School to Prison Pipeline” paradigm and received the inaugural Francine Kee Peterson Memorial Scholarship for Social Justice Advocacy. While at Hampton University, Dr. Brown was selected to be a “Scholar in Residence” at NYU, nationally awarded “Service-Learning Fellow,” and earned the highest distinction given by the President, Provost and Board of Trustees of the prestigious “E.L. Hamm Master Teacher Award for Distinguished Teaching” as a result of having a sustained record of recognized teaching excellence.

Dr. Adolph Brown continues to be a business, community and educational leader whilst being a generous philanthropist and a continuous learner. Bringing People Together to Learn, Laugh & Lead has become his life’s work.

headshot Dr. Brown
Thursday July 14th Keynote Speaker

Dr. Adolph Brown, III

Superintendents Panel on Challenges and Opportunities Facing School Districts

Panelists:  Dr. Lee Ann Kwiatkowski, Superintendent of Muncie Community; Dr. Timothy Hansen, Superintendent, MSD of Warren Township; Dr. Jeff Butts, Superintendent, MSD of Wayne Township; and Dr. Shawn Smith, Superintendent, MSD of Lawrence Township.

The Superintendent’s panel on Challenges and Opportunities Facing School Districts will take place on Thursday, July 14th at 1:45 pm inside the Indiana Convention Center.    The panel, facilitated by Dr. Jamyce Curtis Banks, will address urgent and complex problems facing students, teachers, and administrators, such as school safety, funding, rising mental health challenges, chronic absenteeism, high stakes testing, curriculum, and instruction, and student socio-economic status.  Superintendents will share strategies and promising practices as well as interventions used to combat such challenges.

Dr. Lee Ann Kwiatkowski
Dr. Lee Ann Kwiatkowski

Lee Ann Kwiatkowski serves as the Director of Public Education and Chief Executive Officer of Muncie Community Schools. The full span of her career has been spent working in, or supporting Indiana school systems. She has held roles as Teacher, Principal, Assistant Superintendent, Chief of Staff (DOE), Director of School Improvement (DOE), Senior Education Advisor for the Office of the Governor of Indiana, and Executive Director for the Indiana State Board of Education. Lee Ann has comprehensive experience with strategic planning, policy development and implementation, board relations, and school improvement. She also has significant experience with state and federal programs and budgets at the classroom, school, district, and state levels such as Title I, Title II, gifted and talented, and IDEA (Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act). Lee Ann has administered multiple grants, including a $28.5 million Race-to-the-Top federal grant. In her role at MCS, she has implemented Innovation and Strategic Plans that utilize an innovative cradle-to-career community-based model. Among her many responsibilities, Lee Ann provides leadership to the schools to ensure all faculty, resources, and systemic changes continue to move in a positive and beneficial direction

Dr. Tim Hanson
Dr. Tim Hanson

Dr. Tim Hanson is the Superintendent of the Metropolitan School District of Warren Township, located on the far Eastside of Indianapolis. In his 27 years of experience in education, he has served in six school districts in Illinois, Ohio and in Indiana as a middle school math teacher, athletic coach, middle school assistant principal, elementary school principal, and assistant superintendent. Dr. Hanson, originally from Kankakee, Illinois, is a first time college graduate from his family and holds a Bachelor’s Degree from Eastern Illinois University, Master’s Degrees from the University of Illinois at Chicago and from the University of Cincinnati, a Specialist Degree and a Doctorate from Ball State University. Education has provided multiple pathways for him and he strives to provide these same opportunities for the students he serves in Warren. Outside of work, Tim enjoysbiking, tennis, spending time with his family and two black labs, and cheering on the Chicago Cubs.

Dr. Shawn Smith
Dr. Shawn Smith

Dr. Smith is a native of Indianapolis, IN. He received his formal education from the Indianapolis Public School system (IPS) and received his Bachelor of Science in Secondary Education and Master’s Degree in Education from Indiana University – Bloomington. Dr. Smith completed an Ed.S. and a Ph.D. from Indiana State University in Educational Leadership. Upon completion of the Bachelor of Science degree program, he taught in the Indianapolis Public Schools as well as the Metropolitan School District of Washington Township’s school system.

In 1995, he began his administrative career in Washington Township. He served as an Assistant Principal and Principal. While serving as Principal at Eastwood Middle School from 1998 to 2003, the school was awarded the coveted Four Star School Award by the State of Indiana while under his leadership. Dr. Smith was named District Principal of the Year in 2003 by the Indiana Principal’s Association. He served as President of the Indiana Association of School Principals – District 7 (Indianapolis) from 2006 to 2008.

In 2003, he left Washington Township to join the Metropolitan School District of Pike Township to be the Principal of Pike High School Freshman Center, opening the new Center in the Fall of 2004 serving 850 students. During his time at Pike Township, he has served as a Principal, Director of Student and Community Services and as the Assistant Superintendent of Secondary Education. In 2014, he was selected as Superintendent for the Metropolitan School District of Lawrence Township. The MSD of Lawrence Township has over 16,000 students and is the ninth largest School District in the state of Indiana. Dr. Smith has 32 years of experience in the field of education and today, he is still a passionate educator whose first love is teaching Social Studies.

Dr. Jeff Butts
Dr. Jeff Butts

Dr. Jeff Butts is a proud graduate of Millikin University (BS), Illinois State University (MS), and Purdue University (PhD). He began his career as a public educator in 1992 in central Illinois. Over the past 29 years he has held positions as a bus driver, coach, teacher, athletic director, principal, assistant superintendent, and now superintendent. He became the fifth superintendent in the history of the M.S.D. of Wayne Township on January 1, 2011. Dr. Butts is currently a Broad Fellow Candidate at the Yale School of Management.  He is the 2019 AASA National Superintendent of the Year Runner-up, and a recipient of the 2019 IAPSS Indiana Superintendent of the Year, Ed Tech Digital Trailblazer Award from Indiana COSN, Administrator of the Year from the Indiana High School Press Association, the Indiana Council for Exceptional Children Advocate of the Year, Minority Police Officers Association Award for Outstanding Work in the Community, Cause Driven Leadership Award from the YMCA, Indiana National Guard Awards for Exceptional Support to the Community, The Center for Digital Education Digital Content and Curriculum Achievement Award, Hobson’s Education Advances Award, the Center for Digital Education Top 30 Technologists, Transformers and Trailblazers, and District V Principal of the Year from the Indiana Association of School Principals.

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Kevin Teasley
Kevin Teasley

Kevin Teasley is the founder and president of the Indianapolis-based Greater Education Opportunities Foundation. Teasley founded the GEO Foundation in 1998 to support families wanting better schools for their children. In 2001, Teasley helped to launch one of Indiana’s first charter schools. Over the past 20 years, GEO has started multiple schools and today serves more than 3,600 students in three cities—Gary, Indianapolis and Baton Rouge—and two states—Indiana and Louisiana. GEO schools are known for their endorsed “early college” model which offers high school students unlimited access to college courses and partners with multiple colleges and universities including Indiana University Northwest, Purdue University Northwest, Ivy Tech Community College Lake County, IUPUI, Ivy Tech Community College Indianapolis, Marian University, Rose Hulman Institute for Technology, and Baton Rouge Community College. Students attending GEO Academy schools earn full associate degrees, career certifications and even a bachelor’s degree at no cost to them or their families.

GEO Foundation powers GEO Academy schools. Our schools and students have been featured on CBS Evening News, ABC’s Good Morning America, Fox News and USA Today among others news outlets.

Prior to founding GEO Foundation, Teasley served as president of the American Education Reform Foundation (the precursor to the American Federation for Children), Vice President of the Center for the Study of Popular Culture, Executive Director of California’s Prop. 174 school choice campaign, Vice President of the Los Angeles-based Reason Foundation, Public Relations Associate for Washington, DC-based Heritage Foundation, and as a press Secretary on Capitol Hill and in the Office of Public Liaison for the Reagan Administration.

Teasley received his bachelor’s degree from Indiana University in 1985 in journalism and political science.

Full Conference Schedule

Day 1 Schedule: Wednesday, July 13th (Virtual)

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Presenter

Jennifer Darby, COO for Indiana Youth Insititute and IBE Education Conference Chair

About This Workshop

This presentation will highlight how Indiana high school students can gain a competitive advantage and jump-start on earning college credit while also fulfilling their high school diploma requirements. Earning college credit while in high school improves the likelihood that a high school graduate will persist in college after high school graduation. Let’s talk about it!

Although several Hoosiers are taking advantage of this amazing opportunity, many are being left behind. We will examine the dual credit and dual enrollment equity gaps. Educators will receive guidance on how they might play an integral role in working to close the achievement gap so that all students have an opportunity to benefit.

commisioner lowery

Presenter

Chris Lowery

Chris Lowery was appointed in 2022 to serve as Commissioner for Indiana’s Commission for Higher Education, the coordinating agency charged with ensuring the state’s postsecondary education system is aligned to meet the needs of students and the state. Prior to joining the Commission, Lowery was senior vice president, workforce, careers and adult strategy at Ivy Tech Community College where he provided overall leadership of Ivy Tech workforce and career initiatives and organization. Before working in higher education, Lowery led public policy and engagement for Hillenbrand, Inc. and served as an aide to former Indiana Governor Robert D. Orr and then-Senator Dan Quayle.  

As Commissioner, Lowery is committed to increasing college completion by improving the college-going rate, engaging adult learners and ensuring students of all ages understand the value proposition of higher education. He collaborates with policymakers, higher education leaders and community partners to maintain college affordability and guarantee quality higher education is delivered and tied to career relevance as the Commission continues its efforts to realize the state’s goal of at least 60 percent of Hoosiers with quality education and training beyond high school.  

Currently, Lowery is on the Board of Trustees of the Sagamore Institute think tank where he previously served as chair. Additionally, he serves on the Boards of Directors of AgriNovus Indiana and Shepherd Community. He’s also a member of the Advisory Council for the Council for Adult and Experiential Learning.  

Lowery was Chair of the Career Coaching and Navigation Action Team for Governor Eric Holcomb’s Workforce Cabinet. He has served on various other boards of directors including Gleaners Food Bank, the Indiana Construction Roundtable Foundation, the Indiana Council for Continuing Education, the State Workforce Innovation Council, the Distinguished Alumni Council of the Indiana University O’Neill School of Public Affairs and the Batesville Community School Corporation. He is a regular speaker in Indiana and nationally on topics ranging from the future of higher education, the economy and workforce preparedness to innovation, leadership, and social impact investing.  

Lowery holds the degree of Bachelor of Science in Public Affairs from Indiana University and a Master of Science in Management from Indiana Wesleyan University 

About This Workshop

In this session, participants will learn strategies for the development of meaningful relationships with students. We will focus on how to collect usable data to maximize performance through an intertwining of engagement, rigor, and positive reinforcement strategies. While engagement itself is not a singular strategy for school-wide success, this session will show how engagement can be used in progress monitoring, assessment, and remediation. Collecting the data is essential in helping teachers give new life to their lessons, ensuring standards and objectives are being taught, and enhance instructional strategies. This is not just another tool to use to incentivize learning, as we know the true motivation comes from within, but it can help teach students how to enjoy learning and will motivate them to excel because data becomes an important piece of the learning environment with students collecting and tracking their own data while you, the teacher, do the same. 

Moderator
Annette Johnson

Orleta Holmes

Presenter:

Orleta Holmes

Orleta Holmes received her bachelor’s degree in Education with a certification in Secondary Social Studies from West Virginia State University. She also holds a master’s degree in Curriculum and Instruction.  Her years of educational experience have broadened her understanding and passion in teaching culturally relevant materials, so all scholars feel included in the materials.  In doing this her learners, both youth and adult, always have positive and truthful reference, seeing themselves in the work they do.   

Her unique methodology of teaching has led to her winning multiple Teacher of the Year awards, including the 2020 Teacher of the Year awarded by OEI (Office of Education in Indiana. Her style of teaching works to highlight the importance of creative engagement and relational management, that does wonders to empower and inform students from every background.  Her passion is the fuel for her goals as a professional. In education, that is to see that all scholars are given an equitable education that will propel them into a prosperous future.  Her philosophy can most easily be summed up as shared by esteemed poet, Khalil Gibran which states, “a teacher who is indeed wise does not bid you to enter the house of [their] wisdom but rather leads you to the threshold of your mind.” 

About This Workshop

The academic process demands students learn to critically think, assess situations, and become changemakers in society. Black students experience racial, gender, and class domination that has a lasting impact on the trajectory of their lives. However, how well do institutions equip students with tools to understand, question, and interrogate society’s most pressing issues and concerns? This session seeks to unpack how students have cultivated oppositional identities to topics of interest, what supportive organizations and programs supported their consciousness, and what they do as a result of carrying those oppositional identities. 

Moderator|
Monica M. Johnson, M.S.Ed.

 

DonteMiller

Presenter:

Donté Miller

Donté Miller is a native of Rialto, CA and was raised between there and Los Angeles. He is a proud UCLA alum and obtained a Masters in Higher Education Counseling at USC. He is a doctoral candidate in the Higher Education Ph.D. Program and will defend his dissertation very soon highlighting how Black students’ use their life’s experiences to influence campus/societal change. Donté currently serves as Assistant Director for the Hudson & Holland Scholars Program at IU, where he oversees programming and administration while serving as an Adjunct Assistant professor for their first-year experience course. Donté is a passionate servant-leader occupying numerous spaces to amplify the successes and strategies of Black and other underrepresented minoritized student groups and social movements. 

About This Workshop

For decades there has been a disparity between black and white achievement in literacy. This online workshop examines language as a factor that perpetuates this divide. Reading achievement depends on our spoken language. We will work to examine how many African American children are bidialectal speakers of English and how these children bridge the two varieties to be successful readers and writers. Additionally, we will examine other factors that impede African American children academically such as socioeconomic status, educational opportunities, housing security, and adequate nutrition and healthcare. Finally, we will consider the role of an educator and explore recommendations for teachers. This session will expand a teachers’ knowledge of language variation, AAE speakers’ preschool language exposure, and what classroom practices are most effective in supporting their literacy journey. Be prepared to interact with fellow participants as we gain a better understanding as to how we can take our African American children from merely surviving in our classrooms to thriving in them!   

Moderator|
Dr. Jamyce Banks

 

karen-betz

Presenter:

Karen Betz

Karen Betz, MS. Ed is an Assistant Professor of Literacy at Marian University in Indianapolis, Indiana. She joined Klipsch Educator’s college as a full-time faculty member in 2018, teaching courses at both the undergraduate and graduate level. Prior to her current position, Mrs. Betz spent eighteen years as an elementary classroom teacher and gifted intervention specialist and four years as a building and district coach in urban districts in Ohio and Indiana. Karen Betz is a doctoral candidate in Mount St. Joseph University’s Reading Science program where she is involved in the Colorado Project which supports and educates professors of literacy in Colorado’s higher education institutions on the Science of Reading. She serves on the board of The Reading League-IN. In addition, she trains teachers year-round for the M.A. Rooney Foundation, one of the Indiana Department of Education’s approved Dyslexia training programs

Day 2 Schedule: Thursday, July 14th

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Presenters:

Tanya Mckinzie, President & CEO, Indiana Black Expo, Inc.                                                       

Dr. James C. Wimbush, Vice President for Diversity, Equity, and Multicultural Affairs; Dean of The University Graduate School; and Johnson Chair for Diversity and Leadership, Indiana University Bloomington  

Emcee: Dr. Shenia Suggs, Assistant Superintendent for Human Resources, MSD of Wayne Township  

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james_wimbush_H

Tanya Mckinzie

Attorney Tanya Bell Mckinzie is the President and Chief Executive Officer of Indiana Black Expo, Inc. a non-profit 501(c)(3) organization with 12 chapters in Indiana. As IBE’s President and general counsel for more than 15 years, Tanya oversees day-to-day operations and supervises various programs and initiatives as well as Summer Celebration and Circle City Classic®, fundraising events that generate more than $28 million in annual local spending, attract more than 400,000 attendees annually, and provides annual scholarships that have totaled more than $4.6 million to Indiana students.

Tanya has also served on the Board of Directors for IBE from 2001 until 2007. Immediately preceding her position with IBE, Tanya was the Assistant General Counsel for Community Health Network and an Adjunct Legal Writing Professor at the Indiana University School of Law. While at Community, Tanya managed all of its litigation for five hospitals and more than 70 sites of care. From 2000 to 2003, Tanya was a Litigation Attorney at Ice Miller where she first became acquainted with IBE while serving as outside corporate counsel.

More than 15 years ago, Tanya worked with several community stakeholders to create IBE’s Education Conference to provide quality professional development for educators and administrators across the state in areas of social justice, equity, alternative discipline, classroom management, restorative justice and trauma informed practices. Today, more than 5000 educators and administrators across the country receive professional development annually at this conference.

Tanya has led several task forces that focus on addressing quality of life issues for Black youth and families, including the City of Indianapolis’ Your Life Matters® Anti-violence Task Force and IBE’s State of Our Black Youth Task Force. Tanya is currently leading a statewide outreach initiative to provide training, technical assistance, counseling and development to minority-owned businesses across the state of Indiana. Under Tanya’s leadership, IBE launched its state-of-the-art Performing Arts Academy to develop the talents of youth while providing them with necessary supports and interventions inside IBE’s headquarters, which includes a brand new Black Box Theater, located on the east side of Indianapolis. In 2019, IBE was named by President Barack Obama’s Foundation as a “Community to Watch” for its work to improve life outcomes for boys and young men of color in Central Indiana. Under Tanya’s leadership, IBE has also remained debt-free.

Tanya graduated cum laude from Indiana University School of Law in Indianapolis where she obtained her Juris Doctorate. She received her undergraduate degree in Social Studies Education from Indiana State University.

Tanya currently serves on the board of directors for the Indiana Chamber of Commerce and is a trustee for Indiana State University. She also is a member of several coalitions and serves on many committees, including the Indiana Coalition of Youth Justice Steering Committee, African American Coalition of Indianapolis Steering Committee, Indiana Payday Coalition, and Indiana Business & Community Partnership for Racial Equity.

Tanya has received numerous awards. She has been named a Sagamore of the Wabash by Governor Eric Holcomb which is the highest honor of distinction in Indiana.

James Winbush, Ph.D.

James C. Wimbush is Indiana University’s vice president for diversity, equity, and multicultural affairs; dean of The University Graduate School; and Johnson Chair for Diversity and Leadership.

Under his guidance, IU’s Office of the Vice President for Diversity, Equity, and Multicultural Affairs (OVPDEMA) has prioritized the recruitment and retention of underrepresented faculty, staff, and students and timely graduation of students. At the same time ensuring that Indiana University maintains a learning environment where people of all backgrounds can thrive while keeping a commitment to local and national outreach and advocacy.

Vice President Wimbush has helped IU garner national recognition for its efforts in diversity and inclusion in recent years, receiving such honors as:

  • The Higher Education Excellence in Diversity (HEED) award and Champion of Diversity award, presented by INSIGHT Into Diversity, the oldest and largest diversity publication in higher education
  • The Institutional Excellence award from the National Association of Diversity Officers in Higher Education (NADOHE)
  • Campus Pride’s “Best of the Best” of the top-25 LGBTQ-friendly college campus in the U.S.

IU has also established numerous diversity and inclusion initiatives spearheaded by Vice President Wimbush, including:

  • IU’s Antiracist Agenda, a thorough assessment and evaluation of the university, enhancing antiracist policies and practices
  • IU’s Black Philanthropy Circle and IU’s Queer Philanthropy Circle, two initiatives designed to foster philanthropy and provide resources to improve the recruitment, retention, and degree attainment for students and the quality of professional life for faculty and staff on all IU campuses
  • First Nations Leadership Ambassadors Council, an effort to better connect to and gain insight from the Native American community

For the 2019-2020 academic year, IU’s population of underrepresented minority students reached 26.5 percent. This progress is well above Indiana’s underrepresented population of 24.2 percent. Other significant milestones that have occurred during Vice President Wimbush’s tenure include:

  • Establishment of the IU Racial Justice Research Fund providing grants for IU faculty, connecting researchers, and hosting ongoing “Racial Justice Research Workshop” series, in partnership with the Vice President for Research Fred Cate
  • Administration of IU’s $1 million Pandemic Health Disparities Fund from the Office of the President focused on a broad range of wellness needs for students on all IU campuses, especially COVID-19’s impact on communities of color
  • Management of a $1.6 million grant from the Office of Naval Research to train diverse STEM researchers in partnership with minority-serving institutions across the nation
  • Facilitated IU’s first diversity assessment, conducted by the independent firm Halualani & Associates that has served as a baseline measurement and inform strategic planning efforts
  • Establishment of a university-wide bias incident reporting system

Vice President Wimbush acquired his B.S. from Averett University and earned a master’s degree in human resources management and industrial and labor relations. He earned a Ph.D. in management from Virginia Polytechnic Institute (Virginia Tech). Since 1991, Vice President Wimbush has been a professor of business administration in IU Bloomington’s Kelley School of Business, where he has chaired several departments and received multiple teaching awards

About This Workshop

Indiana Department of Education Secretary Dr. Katie Jenner and Indiana’s Chief Equity, Inclusion and Opportunity Officer Dr. Karrah Herring will provide a level-set of the state’s most recent academic impact data following the educational disruptions caused by the pandemic. This data continues to show the disproportionate impact of these disruptions on racially and ethnically diverse, low income, English learner and special education students. After presenting this data, the team will also outline several tactical examples of how IDOE is working with the office of the CEIOO and other partners to address educational outcomes for all Indiana students, with a keen focus on our state’s most at-risk populations.

Moderator
Dr. Shenia Suggs – Assistant Superintendent for Human Resources at MSD Wayne Township

Indiana Department of Education Secretary Dr. Katie Jenner
Indiana Department of Education Secretary Dr. Katie Jenner
Indiana’s Chief Equity, Inclusion and Opportunity Officer Dr. Karrah Herring
Indiana’s Chief Equity, Inclusion and Opportunity Officer Dr. Karrah Herring

Presenters

Katie Jenner, Ed. D.

Katie Jenner, Ed. D. was appointed as Indiana’s first Secretary of Education by Governor Eric J. Holcomb, effective January 11, 2021. Prior to her appointment, Dr. Jenner served as Senior Education Advisor to Governor Holcomb where she provided guidance on statewide policy and initiatives for preschool, K-12, and higher education. 

Dr. Jenner began her career in K-12 public education as a Career and Technical Education teacher in Kentucky. After moving to Indiana, she held various administrator roles, including assistant superintendent for Madison Consolidated Schools. Dr. Jenner later served as the Vice President of K-12 Initiatives and Statewide Partnerships for Ivy Tech Community College where she led statewide strategies and formed partnerships between K-12 education, Career Centers, and Ivy Tech. 

Dr. Jenner earned a bachelor’s degree in Business from Transylvania University in Kentucky, a master’s degree in Business Education from the University of Kentucky, an M.B.A. through a Woodrow Wilson Fellowship at Indiana State University, and a Doctorate in Educational Leadership from the University of Kentucky. 

Karrah Herring

Karrah (Miller) Herring is a native and resident of South Bend, IN and a proud graduate of the South Bend Community School Corporation. She received her Bachelor of Arts in Communications/Public Relations from Purdue University (’05) and her Juris Doctorate from Valparaiso University School of Law (’11). On November 19, 2020, Indiana governor, Eric Holcomb announced his appointment of Karrah to his cabinet as Indiana’s first-ever Chief Equity, Inclusion and Opportunity Officer for the state. In this role, she works with the governor and his team to improve state government operations as well as remove hurdles in the government workplace and services the state provides. During the foundational phase of the office, Karrah engaged with over 300 stakeholders, built the infrastructure of the office, and in conjunction with other agencies rolled out the State of Indiana’s first ever Equity Data Portal. Her team’s work focuses on growing statewide access and opportunity in education and economic development and enhancing employee experiences within Indiana state government’s executive branch.

Prior to joining Governor Holcomb’s team, Karrah worked for the University of Notre Dame for nearly a decade and served as the Director of Public Affairs in the Office of Public Affairs and Communications. Prior to her role with Public Affairs, she served on the University of Notre Dame’s Office of Human Resources Senior Executive Leadership team as the Director of the Office of Institutional Equity and University Title IX Coordinator.

Karrah has received a number of awards and recognition and serves on various boards and commissions. She was named to the Indianapolis Business Journal’s prestigious Forty leaders under 40 2022 list.  Last year, she was named by the South Bend Regional Chamber as the 2021 Woman of Influence. In October of 2021, the chief justice of the Indiana Supreme Court, Justice Rush, asked Karrah to serve as the executive branch’s representative on the Indiana Supreme Court’s Commission on Equity and Access within Indiana Courts. Karrah is not only serving on the commission but is also chairing the subcommittee within the commission to look at pathways to the legal profession’s bench and bar for historically underrepresented groups. She is also a member of the Center for Digital Government’s Digital Equity Advisory Committee, the NASHP Population and Public Health Steering Committee and she is a member of the Board of Directors for Sunz Insurance and Sunz Holdings LLC (Bradenton, Florida).

Karrah is the assistant pastor of her family’s church, Faith Alive Ministries in South Bend, where she supports her brother, the senior pastor, Pastor YPJ, and their parents Bishop Eddie and Diana Miller. In 2020, Karrah authored a book on the intersection of race and gender and the complexities of how Black women navigate corporate culture, religion, higher education and athletics.

Karrah is married to Ray Herring (graduate of the University of Notre Dame ’09) and they have three children, Bryce, Brianna and Ja’Mari.

About This Workshop

Mr. Jackson will share strategies on how to educate, activate, and motivate students and staff through these trying times of a pandemic, school shootings, and other traumatic experiences. Educators and administrators will learn how to work with staff and students who have experienced trauma, while building strategies for inclusion and relationship building. Administrators and School Leaders will be challenged to self-evaluate their own connection techniques including their thought process to assist in the success of their students and staff. 

Moderator
Peggy Surbey, Regional Manager, Indiana Department of Child Services, Region 10

Keynote:

Robert Jackson

Robert Jackson

For every problem, there is a solution.  This is Jackson’s motto.  Jackson began his teaching career 26 years ago in Indianapolis Public Schools with a No More Excuses teaching approach with all of his students after being cut from the NFL Minnesota Vikings in 1995. As an educator, he didn’t allow his students to feel sorry for themselves or let their circumstances define their futures. He set high expectations for his students and expected them to do well. As a Coach, the same rules applied. Those same students went from low performing to successful Pastors, Lawyers, School Administrators, Teachers, Pharmaceutical Sales Reps, Business Owners, Pro Athletes, Entertainers and more. 

 Jackson has become one of the most sought-after speakers in the country, delivering keynote addresses and workshops to educators, administrators, parents and students, corporate events and churches. He has delivered hundreds of presentations and has become an expert in teaching cultural diversity, restorative practices, socio-emotional learning, trauma-informed care, and the education of Black and Latino males. His goal is to teach educators and administrators how to use their power more effectively to educate, activate and motivate all students to be successful. 

 Jackson has written and published six books and has written articles for ASCD EL Leadership Magazine. His latest ASCD book, “Becoming the Educator They Need: Strategies, Mindsets, and Beliefs for Supporting Male Black and Latino Students” won the Gold Excel Award for Technical Writing in 2020. His “No More Excuses” Curriculum has been featured in publications nationally and is being utilized in K-12 Schools, Colleges and Universities in the US and Canada. His other books include, “Black Men Stand Up”, “A Boys Guide to Manhood”, “A Young Woman’s Guide to Womanhood”, “Put a Stop to Bullying” and “Solutions to Educating Black and Latino Males.” 

 Jackson attended Western Kentucky University where he received his BS Degree in Industrial Technology while lettering four years in both Football and Track. After being cut from the NFL, he was broken himself and understands the importance of educators and administrators being sensitive to students who have experienced trauma and letdowns. He teaches solutions while remaining deeply rooted in his commitment to serve his community as a speaker and mentor. He has keynoted and conducted workshops at national conferences including ASCD, ESEA, CAAASA, NABSE, SREB, Innovative Schools Summit, AMLE, and AASA. 

 Jackson is a Life Member of Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity Inc. and the NFL Players Association. He has received numerous awards for his work including the NOBLE Justice by Action Youth Award, the Key to the City of Miami, Florida, and the National Motivational Educator of the Year Award by the Alpha Foundation. Thousands of youth and adults are being transformed through his speeches and presentations. 

About This Workshop

As Indiana high schools develop programming to provide students with worthwhile PATHWAYS to further education or career opportunities after graduation, there is a need even among educators to gain clarity about the process and ways this affects their students in and out of the classroom. The goals of this session is to (1) provide context and data one why this is the chosen strategy; (2) give insights to how the process works; and to give strategies on how this can be utilized in the classroom to ensure fidelity & teacher buy-in. 

Moderator|
Evelyn Hicks, President, National Sorority of Phi Delta Kappa, Inc. – Tau Chapter  

 

Yoshida Bolds

Presenter:

Yoshida Bolds
Yoshida Bolds was born and raised in St. Louis, Missouri and is a proud product of the St.  Louis Public School System. She relocated to Indianapolis in 2011 with the intention of beginning her journey of starting a family with her husband William and their daughters. During this time of transition, she also began her studies at IUPUI in SPEA/Education at Indiana University-Purdue University of Indianapolis (IUPUI). Mrs. Bolds has also earned her certification through Butler University’s EPPSP program in 2021. Yoshida currently serves as a guidance Counselor for Indianapolis Public Schools and serves as a PRN Therapist with Options Behavioral Health Center. With all her amazing accomplishments and experience, Yoshida has recently launched her very own non-profit organization that honors the legacy of her loving parent called, Mertha’s Loving Care. 

About This Workshop

To create a thriving learning environment for Black children, we must go beyond preparing them to operate within our current educational context. Black children hold valuable strengths based on their development and perceptions of their Black identity in sociocultural context. However, when it comes to an understanding of what best fits the learning needs of Black children, it is the educational context that can benefit from a change. By leveraging Black children’s strengths, we can move toward endless possibilities for learning and growth. This presentation discusses the challenges we currently face in creating equitable learning contexts and highlights how strength-focused approaches can best fit the educational needs of Black children in grades K – 12. As a developmental psychologist, Dr. Riley’s research focuses on the sociocultural context of Black youth and families and well-being. The primary focus of this presentation’s discussion is on the need to change the current demands of the educational context in consideration of Black Children’s identity and developmental needs.

Moderator
Dr. Lamara Warren, Assistant Dean for Diversity and Inclusion, Indiana University

Dr. Tennisha Riley

Presenter:

Tennisha N. Riley, Ph.D
Dr. Riley is a Developmental Psychologist and Assistant Professor in the Counseling and Educational Psychology department at Indiana University – Bloomington. She received her Ph.D. from Virginia Commonwealth University in developmental psychology with a focus on adolescent health and emotional well-being. As the principal investigator of the BEInG research team, her research focuses on the emotional development of Black youth and their families. Dr. Riley has two primary areas of interest: (1) how emotions and emotion regulation are influenced by Black youth experiences and context, such as family, peers, and schools, and (2) How processes of emotion regulation might underly negative health behaviors and/or prosocial behaviors during adolescence. Prior to completing her doctoral studies, Dr. Riley worked as a multisystemic family therapist. Much of her research interests in adolescents, families, and intervention are the result of her experiences as a therapist. 

About This Workshop

A panel of teachers and noted experts moderated by Jerell Blakeley, Indiana State Teachers Association Director of Government, Community, and Racial and Social Justice

Research shows that all students, particularly students of color, perform better in school when taught by educators of color. Yet, according to the National Center for Education Statistics, Black educators make up only 7 percent of the teaching workforce and that number is in decline. In this session, you’ll hear from educators and experts discuss the historical and present-day reasons for this decline, how institutional racism has impacted Black educator recruitment and retention, and offer solutions and best practices for attracting and retaining Black educators to the teaching profession in Indiana.

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Moderator
LaQuita Maxey, UniServ Organizer, Indiana State Teachers Association

JBlakeley Headshot

Presenter:

Jerell Blakeley
Jerell Blakeley joined the state’s largest teachers’ union, the Indiana State Teachers Association, in March 2022 serving as its first director of government, community, racial & social justice. Blakeley hails from Trenton, New Jersey where he most recently served as an associate director of government relations for the New Jersey Education Association. He brings a wealth of experience in labor and education organizing public policy and electoral politics. As associate director, he served as a lobbyist and political organizer. Blakeley earned his bachelor’s degree in history from Howard University and holds a master’s degree in the Social and Philosophical Foundations of Education as a Martin-Eagleton Fellow of Government at Rutgers University-New Brunswick’s Graduate School of Education.

About This Workshop

As educators, we now stand in the face of a new challenge — returning to in-person school to create a new normal — amidst the delta variant and other variants recently speculated. We’re in the midst of a continuing national increase in COVID cases. In response to this present challenge, Boards of Education, central office leaders, and educators work tirelessly to prepare to educate students in a safe learning environment while continuing to exercise grace and dynamic flexibility to respond to the moment. However, the fact is that students and staff are struggling to manage their emotional and psychological health and safety. Students and adults report heightened levels of stress, reduced self-management skills, and increased needs for support in schools, especially emotionally. This point is certainly not unique to schools (we know schools are microcosms of broader society and situated within communities). Still, educators and school leaders must be mindful of the stress within the bodies of the students [and staff] daily entering the school doors.  

This session will discuss the importance of social-emotional wellness for adults and students as a condition for teaching and learning to reduce educator stress load to ultimately improve educational outcomes for students.   

Moderator
Dr. Jamyce Curtis-Banks, Founder & CEO of Whatever It Takes Consulting

Dr.-Karlin-Tichenor-1536x1125

Presenter:

Dr. Karlin Tichenor Bio  
Dr. Karlin J. Tichenor is native to Indianapolis and an alumn of Pike High School. He is a graduate of Denison University where he studied Psychology and Communication Arts and he received both his masters and doctorate degrees from Michigan State University in Marriage and Family Therapy and Human Development and Family Studies with a specialization in Couple and Family Therapy, respectively. Dr. Tichenor is an expert clinical scholar and practitioner. Previously, he was the Director of Social-Emotional Health at the Indiana Youth Institute and the Associate Superintendent of School Culture in the Lansing School District (MI).  In his various capacities and projects, he works to improve the quality of life of others with emphasis on mental health and wellness. He supports the development of future clinicians as an adjunct professor at Abilene Christian University in the Marriage Family Therapy Program

About This Workshop

Chronic Absenteeism – Let’s Address It

Over the past decade, chronic absence (missing 10 percent or more of school days) has gone from being an unknown issue to a national education metric that is tracked and used as a warning sign that a student’s academic success is in jeopardy.  Chronic absenteeism can significantly impact academic achievement throughout each grade level and is linked to lack of reading proficiency and dropping out of high school.  Children who live in poverty, who suffer from chronic health conditions or disabilities, or who experience homelessness or frequently moves are disparately impacted.   Many schools throughout our state face high levels of chronic absence. In this workshop, our presenters will share key strategies for improving attendance and reducing chronic absenteeism in schools.

Moderator
Dr. Carolyn Gentle-Genitty, Founder, Lead Consultant and Chief Executive Officer for Pivot Attendance Solutions and James Taylor, MSW, Director of Student/Social Services for MSD Warren Township

Presenters

Presenters:

Dr. Carolyn Gentle-Genitty

Dr. Carolyn Gentle-Genitty, founder, lead consultant, and Chief Education Officer for Pivot Attendance Solutions. She is the co-founder and Vice President of the International Network for School Attendance (INSA); past president, executive board member, research chairwoman, past editor, and life-time member of the International Association for Truancy and Dropout Prevention (IATD); lead researcher for Indiana, Belize, and the Caribbean for the International Self-Reported Delinquency Survey (ISRD4), and Indiana’s representative to the national organization Network to Advance State Attendance Policies and Practices (NASAPP) under the exemplary leadership of Executive Director of Attendance Works Heady Chang. 

 She is the lead researcher and co-developer of the Education and Support Program offered through Warren Township as an alternative to arrest program and the author and developer of the first and only Perception of School Social Bonding (PSSB) instrument endorsed by the American Psychological Association. She is one of four leaders in the field that developed the first world conference on absenteeism in the Leiden, Netherlands with support from the Lorenz Center and was conference chair and co-lead of the first world-wide conference, held in Oslo Norway. Through this work, her organization INSA was commissioned by the Swedish Jerring Foundation to convene world leaders to prepare the first Anthology on School Attendance Problems edited by Dr. Malin Gren-Landell. Even with all the work that she has done, Dr. Gentle-Genitty is poised to bring long-impact innovations, in partnership with her colleagues and partners, to the field of absenteeism. 

 

James Taylor, MS

Mr. Taylor is currently the Director of both Student/Social Services for MSD Warren Schools, as well as for the Moorhead Community Resource Center. In these roles he is able to fulfill his passion of meeting the needs of underserved youth from across the city. While serving those esteemed capacities, he also contributes to the next generation of mental health professionals as an Adjunct professor for the IU School of Social Work where he teaches classes in Mental Health and Social Welfare Policy. Mr. Taylor even carries his passion into the juvenile justice system where he is on several boards and task forces to help solve major issues related to truancy and youth offenders. 

 

About This Workshop

In what ways did COVID-19 impact academic success for local students? What programs can schools create to foster healing after COVID? If you are curious what can be done to put the pieces together for students after dealing with COVID, this session is for you. Learn what local schools tried and had success with to positively impact the academic, the mental and the social aspects of development.

Moderator
Lauren I. Peterson, Senior Director of Community Engagement, The Mind Trust 

Vincent_De Meita Headshot

Presenter:

De Meita Vincent Bio 
De Meita Vincent is a 2021-2022 Teach Plus Indiana Innovations Teacher Collaborative teacher leader who teaches at Purdue Polytechnic High School in Indianapolis. A 19-year educator, De Meita has served her local educational union, participated on educational panels, created clubs that engage and challenge students, and has coached staff members. De Meita received her BS in Biology from Indiana University and her MS from Oakland City University. 

About This Workshop

Retaining teachers is more important than ever. This group of educators has spent the last year reflecting on the issue of teacher retention and how Indiana can continue to be innovative in this area. Looking at teacher mentorship, co-teaching, and career ladders, we’ve compiled findings from across the state and country to help us develop recommendations for school, district, and legislative leaders in our state. 

Moderator
Brittany Collins

Glassey_Molly 1
TeachPlus_Halle_Shine

Presenters:

Molly Glassey’s Bio 
Molly Glassey is a 2021-22 Teach Plus Indiana Senior Alumni Fellow and a 2019-20 Policy Fellow. Molly is a 1st and 2nd grade dual language teacher at Clear Creek Elementary in Bloomington, IN. She leads the dual language team in creating curriculum and building the Dual Language Immersion (DLI) program and is a member of the leadership team at her school. Molly previously worked as an English teacher in Seville and Toledo, Spain and was awarded an Indiana teachers grant through The Chinese Education Connection to teach a two-week STEM unit in Hangzhou, China in July 2019. Molly holds a BS in Elementary Education from Indiana University. 

Halle Shine’s Bio 
Halle Shine is a 2021-2022 Teach Plus Indiana Policy Fellow and a Remedial Math Teacher at Indianapolis Metropolitan High School. Halle started an Adventure Club on her campus, where she takes students on excursions and supports them in linking their Social Emotional Learning to overcoming challenges outdoors. Halle is a TFA Milwaukee 2018 alum who received her BA in Environmental Management and Swahili from Indiana University and an MA in Education from Alverno College. 

About This Workshop

In this session, Super School 19 teacher, Andrea Wilburn, will highlight the success she saw in implementing her change effort. The goal of the project was to develop targeted interventions and digital data trackers; to measure student growth. This year-long intervention has four parts: guided reading that focused on fluency and reading comprehension; writing which focused on stamina throughout the year; Lexia (platform) that focused on foundational skills; and testing practices which taught decoding methods.

Moderator
Dr. Gwen Kelley, Educational Consultant and Advocate; Vice-Chair, Children’s Policy and Law Initiative of Indiana 

Andrea Wilburn

Presenter:

Andrea Wilburn’s Bio 
Andrea Wilburn taught English Language Arts at Super School 19 from 2018 to 2022. As an educator, her hope is to inspire students to have fun in the process of learning and to make them feel comfortable in the classroom. She has a passion for teaching and loves working with middle schoolers to discover their love for literature. Her students inspire her on a daily basis, and she is constantly learning from them as well. When she is not at school, she is a wife and mother to three energetic kiddos. Additionally, Andrea serves as the Director of Operations at Alliance for LIFE who assists the children of Indiana in an array of services with the primary focus on social and emotional health. She received her Master’s Degree in Secondary Education from IUPUI School of Education, and plans to return for her PHD in the near future. 

About This Workshop

The Indiana Civil Rights Law provides protections for equal opportunity for education based on certain protected classes. This session will explore what these rights are and how they are enforced in Indiana, from the perspective of both the parent and the student, especially in today’s evolving educational landscape. Participants will gain a better understanding of education-related civil rights in Indiana and how to file a complaint if they believe their civil rights have been violated. 

Moderator
Mrs. Shawn Bush, Director of Student Services, MSD of Lawrence Township  

ICRC

Presenter:

David A. Fleischhacker Bio 
David Fleischhacker joined the Indiana Civil Rights Commission as Deputy Director and General Counsel. Prior to joining ICRC, David served over four years as the Employee Relations Deputy Counsel in the Indiana State Personnel Department. In his 11+ years of government service, he has also worked as a Staff Attorney for the Indiana Department of Correction and in various roles with the Office of the Indiana Attorney General. David has also been an Adjunct Faculty member for the IU School of Liberal Arts since 2014, regularly teaching the Fundamentals of Speech Communication course. David holds a J.D. from the IU McKinney School of Law, as well as an M.P.A., Non-Profit Management concentration, and a B.A., Communication Studies, both from the IUPUI campus. 

About This Workshop

This session will look at comprehensive academic and social support initiatives prioritizing Black male student success. Participants will walk away with tools to implement best practices after hearing from a panel of Ivy Tech professionals who will share how they’ve utilized data to design high impact practices.

Moderator
Amanda L. Bonilla- Vice Chancellor for Diversity Equity Belonging and Community Engagement

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Presenters:

Treon McClendon- Director of Student Life

Marvin Smith- Automotive Recruiter

Alonzo Ross- Interim Executive Director of K-14 Initiatives

Lunch and Distinguished Educator Awards Presentation

Panelists:

About This Workshop

The panel, facilitated by Dr. Jamyce Curtis Banks, will address urgent and complex problems facing students, teachers, and administrators, such as school safety, funding, rising mental health challenges, chronic absenteeism, high stakes testing, curriculum and instruction and student socio-economic status.  Superintendents will share strategies and promising practices and interventions used to combat such challenges.   

Panelists

Dr. Lee Ann Kwiatkowski, Superintendent of Muncie Community Schools

Dr. Timothy Hansen, Superintendent, MSD of Warren Township

Dr. Jeff Butts, Superintendent, MSD of Wayne Township

Dr. Shawn Smith, Superintendent, MSD of Lawrence Township

Kevin Teasley, Greater Education Opportunities Foundation.

Moderator:

Dr. Jamyce Banks

Dr. Lee Ann Kwiatkowski
Dr. Lee Ann Kwiatkowski
Dr. Shawn Smith
Dr. Shawn Smith
Dr. Jeff Butts
Dr. Jeff Butts
Dr. Tim Hanson
Dr. Tim Hanson
Kevin Teasley
Kevin Teasley
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Presenter

James Winbush, Ph.D.

James C. Wimbush is Indiana University’s vice president for diversity, equity, and multicultural affairs; dean of The University Graduate School; and Johnson Chair for Diversity and Leadership.

Under his guidance, IU’s Office of the Vice President for Diversity, Equity, and Multicultural Affairs (OVPDEMA) has prioritized the recruitment and retention of underrepresented faculty, staff, and students and timely graduation of students. At the same time ensuring that Indiana University maintains a learning environment where people of all backgrounds can thrive while keeping a commitment to local and national outreach and advocacy.

Vice President Wimbush has helped IU garner national recognition for its efforts in diversity and inclusion in recent years, receiving such honors as:

  • The Higher Education Excellence in Diversity (HEED) award and Champion of Diversity award, presented by INSIGHT Into Diversity, the oldest and largest diversity publication in higher education
  • The Institutional Excellence award from the National Association of Diversity Officers in Higher Education (NADOHE)
  • Campus Pride’s “Best of the Best” of the top-25 LGBTQ-friendly college campus in the U.S.

IU has also established numerous diversity and inclusion initiatives spearheaded by Vice President Wimbush, including:

  • IU’s Antiracist Agenda, a thorough assessment and evaluation of the university, enhancing antiracist policies and practices
  • IU’s Black Philanthropy Circle and IU’s Queer Philanthropy Circle, two initiatives designed to foster philanthropy and provide resources to improve the recruitment, retention, and degree attainment for students and the quality of professional life for faculty and staff on all IU campuses
  • First Nations Leadership Ambassadors Council, an effort to better connect to and gain insight from the Native American community

For the 2019-2020 academic year, IU’s population of underrepresented minority students reached 26.5 percent. This progress is well above Indiana’s underrepresented population of 24.2 percent. Other significant milestones that have occurred during Vice President Wimbush’s tenure include:

  • Establishment of the IU Racial Justice Research Fund providing grants for IU faculty, connecting researchers, and hosting ongoing “Racial Justice Research Workshop” series, in partnership with the Vice President for Research Fred Cate
  • Administration of IU’s $1 million Pandemic Health Disparities Fund from the Office of the President focused on a broad range of wellness needs for students on all IU campuses, especially COVID-19’s impact on communities of color
  • Management of a $1.6 million grant from the Office of Naval Research to train diverse STEM researchers in partnership with minority-serving institutions across the nation
  • Facilitated IU’s first diversity assessment, conducted by the independent firm Halualani & Associates that has served as a baseline measurement and inform strategic planning efforts
  • Establishment of a university-wide bias incident reporting system

Vice President Wimbush acquired his B.S. from Averett University and earned a master’s degree in human resources management and industrial and labor relations. He earned a Ph.D. in management from Virginia Polytechnic Institute (Virginia Tech). Since 1991, Vice President Wimbush has been a professor of business administration in IU Bloomington’s Kelley School of Business, where he has chaired several departments and received multiple teaching awards

About This Keynote

headshot Dr. Brown

Keynote:

Dr. Adolph Brown, III
Dr. Adolph Brown, III is an American businessman, investor, author, urban and rural school educator, research-scientist, and keynote speaker. For over 30 years, Dr. Brown has researched, field-tested, and implemented a set of concrete strategies used to support and enhance schools and businesses around the world. Dr. Brown is best known for inspiring all who hear him to learn, laugh and lead, while as an implicit bias speaker simultaneously reducing unconscious bias at every turn. He is a credentialed Master Teacher and uses those skills to help teachers reach every student. As a much sought-after and highly effective Unconscious Bias, Equity, Diversity and Inclusion keynote speaker, Dr. Brown skillfully addresses the impact of stereotypes.

Although he does not consider himself a motivational speaker, he was selected as one of the top motivational and inspirational speakers in America as well. Dr. Adolph Brown is one of the world’s foremost attitude experts, personal development coaches and humorists. Through his engaging and exciting presentations he has earned the reputation as “The World’s Greatest Edu-tainer!™” !

Dr. Brown has earned undergraduate degrees in anthropology and psychology with a minor in education, master’s degree work in special education and experimental psychology, and a doctorate degree in clinical psychology from the Virginia Consortium for Professional Psychology hosted by Eastern Virginia Medical School, the College of William and Mary, Norfolk State University, and Old Dominion University. Before joining the psychology/education faculty at Hampton University, Dr. Brown became one of the initial major investigators of “The School to Prison Pipeline” paradigm and received the inaugural Francine Kee Peterson Memorial Scholarship for Social Justice Advocacy. While at Hampton University, Dr. Brown was selected to be a “Scholar in Residence” at NYU, nationally awarded “Service-Learning Fellow,” and earned the highest distinction given by the President, Provost and Board of Trustees of the prestigious “E.L. Hamm Master Teacher Award for Distinguished Teaching” as a result of having a sustained record of recognized teaching excellence.

Dr. Adolph Brown continues to be a business, community and educational leader whilst being a generous philanthropist and a continuous learner. Bringing People Together to Learn, Laugh & Lead has become his life’s work.

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